Solid stuff, and far easier than snowblowing. It may be low-profile, but Agri-Cover claims the shape of the plow still allows it to stack snow “higher than a pickup’s hood.” Still, you can see there are parts where I’m backing through deeper stuff that snow also falls over the blade and ends up under my wheels. Speed is also a factor there—the slower you go, the better it works. It’s not designed to scrape down to bare pavement in one pass. This is the kind of tool you should use both during and after a storm for maximum effect.

But the incredible utility here is obvious. Picture the typical suburban setup, a two car garage with a long-ish, relatively flat and straight driveway leading up to it. You just reverse out of the bay, take care of business, and drive forward back into the shelter of your garage. Simple, and warm.

One note for 180 snowplow beginners: While you may be tempted to use your backup camera, the distorted view is not optimum for precise plow placement. Use your mirrors and rear window and you’ll get better, faster results. Got friends or family who could use your new snow clearing skills? The 180 plow can also be nested at the top of the push frame for transportation if you need to go handle mom’s driveway.

At $1,199, the 180 is not cheap. But it’s well constructed and should last a long time. Some assembly is required including drilling some holes, so plan accordingly. I’m still waiting on The Big One to really put it to the test, but its performance today shows how much potential a hitch plow has to save a lot of folks some time and potential frostbite. As long as you’ve got good winter tires. Those are a must for maximum traction—and also, safe winter driving in general.

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